About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 14
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the law, secretary clinton ordered this review to determine exactly what happened in benghazi. that is how we can learn and improve. i want to convey our appreciation to ambassador pickering, admiral mullen and 13. -- their team. in the hours and days after the terrorist attacks, at the secretary's direction, which took immediate steps to protect people and our post. we launched a worldwide review of the overall security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous p
of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is for a vast future also." the words of abraham lincoln. jim from georgia on the republican line. caller: thank
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
you are a republican from georgia or a liberal democrat from manhattan, as soon as a law like that gets passed, people become creative in finding ways to qualify. out of the woodwork, all the folks that would qualify. at the end of the david acton & social security age for everybody was truly disabled and let the market take care of its. people in stress occupations for many years now have been leaving those stress occupations well old age of 65 to go into some other line of work. a good example is people that install floors. it's tough in your knees. you see very few people doing that passed the age of 40. they find other work in the construction sector. baseball players have saw money, they don't have to work when they are done. host: let's hear from paul, a republican, in indiana. caller: how are you? there's a competing network of button tot has a access "rise above." if i had a button, it would say stop wasteful spending. how much money we would save if we stop wasteful spending. guest: we could also find our sunny and obscure and ridiculous government spending programs.
are at the point where in four days every american's tax rates are scheduled to go up by law. every americans' paychecks will get considerably smaller. that would be the wrong thing to do for our economy, it would be bad for middle-class families, and it would be bad for businesses that depend on family spending. congress can prevent it if they act right now. i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic we may reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. senators reid and mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak, but if an agreement is not reached in time between senator reid and senator mcconnell, then i will urge senator reid to bring to the floor a basic package for an up or down vote to protect the middle class from an income tax hike, extends the vital lifeline of unemployment insurance to 2 million americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future cooperation on more economic growth and deficit reduction. i believe such a proposal could pas
in their own pockets or they become lobbyists. this secreted a law that they should not be able to become lobbyists for a few years sucker they leave congress or senate. they need to just bring america back up. if it would bring more jobs back to america, then we would have more taxes to be collected. host: more in the financial times this morning. capitol hill plays out a cliffhanger is the headline. the right the mood of the members matches the state of negotiations, l tempered, resentful and having their christmas breaks interrupted by another partisan budget impasse and in no frame of mind a compromise. we are talking about the senate negotiating a on the air. caller: thank you for taking my call. i am going to join the democrats, at least most of them, i hope. i am so disgusted and so disheartened. i feel that the republicans are being obstructionists on purpose. that is obvious. anyhow, they need to -- it is not about parties and politics anymore. it comes down to looking out for america. ok? host: why do you think they are being obstructionist? what do they have to gain by doing th
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)